Egypt burns as protesters resist Hosni Mubarak rule with violence

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Hosni Mubarak

Violent protests have spread across the Egyptian capital, Cairo, and other Egyptian cities as tens of thousands of demonstrators intensified their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak.

Protesters have been pouring out from mosques after noon prayers on Friday and clashing with police who fired tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons to disperse the crowds

The impact is much obvious across the World and the message is sounding louder to Africa’s sit tight rulers, Egypt has come from the cold to resist fascism as they are on the street about four nights running  to  offer thump down award  to the government of Hosni Mubarak.

The impact of the riot is rapidly snowballing with internet connections shut down by government agents.

In an attempt to stop the frenzied online spread of dissent against President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule, not only Facebook and Twitter but the entire Internet was shut down overnight, leaving some 20 million users stranded.

Hundreds of service providers offer connections in Egypt, but just four own the infrastructure.

The current protests on the streets of Cairo appears unprecedented as rioters have set fire to the NDP (National Democratic Party, the ruling party) headquarters.

The violence continues, and the government deployed military and police in an attempt to enforce a curfew that few are abiding.  Suez, Alexandria, and Cairo have been the main flash-points throughout the day.

Gunshots and explosions are audible as thousands continue to ignore the government-mandated curfew.

Timeline of events :

January 2011: Activists in Egypt call for an uprising in their own country, to protest against poverty, unemployment, government corruption and the rule of president Hosni Mubarak, who has been in power for three decades.

January 25: On a national holiday to commemorate the police forces, Egyptians take to the streets in large numbers, calling it a “day of rage”.

Thousands march in downtown Cairo, heading towards the offices of the ruling National Democratic Party, as well as the foreign ministry and the state television. Similar protests are reported in other towns across the country.

After a few hours of relative calm, police and demonstrators clash; police fired tear gas and use water cannons against demonstrators crying out “Down with Mubarak” in Cairo’s main Tahrir Square.

Protests break out in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, the Nile Delta cities of Mansura and Tanta and in the southern cities of Aswan and Assiut, witnesses say.

Hours after the countrywide protests began, the interior ministry issues a statement blaming the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s technically banned but largest opposition party, for fomenting the unrest – a claim that the Muslim Brotherhood denies.

Egypt protest organisers heavily relied on social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter.

Egypt’s interior minister says three protesters and a police officer have been killed during the anti-government demonstration

January 26: A protester and a police officer are killed in central Cairo as anti-government demonstrators pelt security forces with rocks and firebombs for a second day, according to witnesses.

Police use tear gas, water cannons and batons to disperse protesters in Cairo. Witnesses say that live ammunition was also fired into the air.

In Suez, the scene of bloody clashes the previous day, police and protesters clash again.

Medical personnel in Suez say that 55 protesters and 15 police officers have been injured.

Robert Gibbs, a spokesman for Barack Obama, the US president, tell reporters that the government should “demonstrate its responsiveness to the people of Egypt” by recognising their “universal rights”.

Amr Moussa, the secretary general of the Arab League, says he believes “the Arab citizen is angry, is frustrated”.

January 27: Mohamed ElBaradei, the former head of the UN nuclear watchdog turned democracy advocate, arrives in Egypt to join the protests.

ElBaradei says he is ready to “lead the transition” in Egypt if asked.

Meanwhile, protests continue across several cities. Hundreds have been arrested, but the protesters say they will not give up until their demand is met.

Protesters clash with police in Cairo neighbourhoods. Violence also erupts in the city of Suez again, while in the northern Sinai area of Sheikh Zuweid, several hundred bedouins and police exchange live gunfire, killing a 17-year-old man.

In Ismailia, hundreds of protesters clash with police.

Lawyers stage protests in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria and the Nile Delta town of Toukh, north of Cairo.

Facebook, Twitter and Blackberry Messenger services are disrupted.

January 28: Internet and mobile phone text message users in Egypt report major disruption to services as the country prepares for a new wave of protests after Friday prayers.

The Associated Press news agency says an elite special counterterrorism force has been deployed at strategic points around Cairo in the hours before the planned protests. Egypt’s interior ministry also warns of “decisive measures”.

Meanwhile, a lawyer for the opposition Muslim Brotherhood says that 20 members of the officially banned group have been detained overnight.

Egypt remains on edge, as police and protesters prepare for a showdown.

Protest in Egypt as thousands take to street vowingto oust Mubarak