Under-10 pupils attack teachers in schools… 15 cases of child assaults are reported

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    • Experts blame soft parenting and teaching
    • Hampshire, Birmingham, Hertfordshire and Kent had most violent classrooms
    • Other offences include vandalism, theft and sexual misconduct

    Fifteen children aged between four and six are being excluded from school each day for attacking teachers.

    Nearly nine in the same age group are banned daily for violent attacks on fellow pupils and a further nine a day for persistent disruptive behaviour, Government figures show.

    Three a day are sent home for using foul language to teachers.

    Tantrum time: Nearly nine in the same age group are banned daily for violent attacks on fellow pupils and a further nine a day for persistent disruptive behaviourTantrum time: Nearly nine in the same age group are banned daily for violent attacks on fellow pupils and a further nine a day for persistent disruptive behaviour 

    Experts blamed soft parenting and teaching for creating a generation unable to respect authority or interact socially without lashing out.

    They fear that parents struggling to juggle the pressures of modern life are unable to spend quality time with their children. Instead many are left unsupervised in front of a TV or computer and are influenced by the behaviour they see on screen.

    The Government figures for the academic year 2008/2009, the most recent available, found a total of 7,620 children from Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 were given fixed-term exclusions.

    The largest single reason was for attacking an adult. The number of 2,890 cases was an increase of 19 per cent in just two years.

    Hard line: Education Secretary Michael Gove has pledged to tackle bad behaviour. In a White Paper, he has included measures to make it easier for teachers to discipline pupilsHard line: Education Secretary Michael Gove has pledged to tackle bad behaviour. In a White Paper, he has included measures to make it easier for teachers to discipline pupils 

    It was followed by 1,760 for persistent disruptive behaviour, and 1,710 for assault on a fellow pupil. Amongst the other reasons, 90 were suspended for vandalism, 40 for sexual misconduct and 20 for theft.

    The largest number of violent youngsters lived in Hampshire, Birmingham, Hertfordshire and Kent.

    Exclusions is an all-encompassing term including expulsions and suspensions, when pupils are sent home for periods ranging from an afternoon to a few weeks. The majority of the figures released by the Department for Education relate to temporary exclusions. Only 50 pupils aged four to six were expelled permanently.

    Education Secretary Michael Gove has pledged to tackle bad behaviour. In a White Paper, he has included measures to make it easier for teachers to discipline pupils.

    Nick Seaton of the Campaign for Real Education described the figures as ‘extremely disturbing’.

    He said: ‘It’s a massive concern that behavioural problems are starting at such a young age.

    ‘Parenting and teaching is too soft. These adults fail to teach discipline and a respect for authority.

    ‘At a tender age children are told they are the centre of the universe and it makes them too self-centred and totally uncontrollable.

    ‘The problem is compounded by some teachers who, due to a lack of support from senior management, fear disciplining pupils.’

    Intervention needed: Siobhan Freegard of parenting website Mumsnet said young modern children's futures are 'mapped out for them'Intervention needed: Siobhan Freegard of parenting website Mumsnet said young modern children’s futures are ‘mapped out for them’ 

    Siobhan Freegard of parenting website Mumsnet said urgent intervention is needed. ‘You can see their future mapped out for them,’ she said. ‘They are tomorrow’s hoodies, thugs and gang members.’

    Teachers’ leaders blame parents for bad behaviour. Chris Keates of the NASUWT said: ‘Teachers are not receiving the support they need from parents, school leaders or government to assist them in maintaining high standards of pupil behaviour.

    ‘Parents can’t simply abandon their responsibilities at the school gate.’

    By KATE LOVEYS, Daily Mail