Wole Soyinka may go into politics, hints about forming a progressive front

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Professor Wole Soyinka
Professor Wole Soyinka

Nigerian Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka has declared that the current generation has failed the nation completely  and therefore the need for the current generation of youngsters to recapture what had been taken away in form of good governance for Nigeria.

The academician who turned 76 recently however hold the belief that unless there is physical participation and involvement, the nation would remain stalled in uncertainty,

He there announced his  plans to launch a new political party after years of harshly criticising corruption and mismanagement which had characterised the nations body polity.

The announcement was made during a brief remark he made at an event to commemorate his 76 birthday activities

He said he hoped to form a party of “progressives” to contest elections expected early next year.

The author of “The Swamp Dwellers” criticised the current generation of leaders in Nigeria for lack of direction

A oil rich nation, Nigeria’s fortune for long has been  squandered and the government has failed to provide basic services, such as sufficient electricity, good roads, water supply, welfare provisions and many more among other failures.

“My generation has failed the nation,” he said, pledging to launch the party in September and calling it an “organ of collaboration for progressive forces”.

Soyinka, who won the Nobel literature prize in 1986, urged Nigerians to join the new party to unseat the ruling People’s Democratic Party (PDP), which has been in office since May 1999 following the country’s return to civilian rule.

Tuesday’s event in his honour also featured a lecture by the ex-head of the country’s anti-graft agency, Nuhu Ribadu, who returned to Nigeria recently after going into exile last year.

Nuhu had fled Nigeria after surviving an assassination bid, allegedly over his anti-graft crusade in a country ranked as one of the world’s most corrupt by Transparency International.

“Corruption has made it difficult for the country to give adequate protection to its only source of revenue: petroleum and gas,” he said.

“The result is that today, Nigeria has one of the lowest per capital incomes in the world.”

He said “political leaders in the last 30 years have converted such revenue to sources of easy personal wealth…”

Ribadu, a retired policeman, was appointed chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission by former president Olusegun Obasanjo in 2001 but was removed in controversial circumstances six years later as stakeholders in the previous regime of Umaru Musa Yar’Adua stage-managed his removal following fears of corrupt accusations and eventual legal actions.

The academician who turned 76 recently however hold the belief that unless there is physical participation and involvement, the nation would remain stalled in uncertainty,

He there announced his  plans to launch a new political party after years of harshly criticising corruption and mismanagement which had characterised the nations body polity.

The announcement was made during a brief remark he made at an event to commemorate his 76 birthday activities

He said he hoped to form a party of “progressives” to contest elections expected early next year.

The author of “The Swamp Dwellers” criticised the current generation of leaders in Nigeria for lack of direction

A oil rich nation, Nigeria’s fortune for long has been  squandered and the government has failed to provide basic services, such as sufficient electricity, good roads, water supply, welfare provisions and many more among other failures.

“My generation has failed the nation,” he said, pledging to launch the party in September and calling it an “organ of collaboration for progressive forces”.

Soyinka, who won the Nobel literature prize in 1986, urged Nigerians to join the new party to unseat the ruling People’s Democratic Party (PDP), which has been in office since May 1999 following the country’s return to civilian rule.

Tuesday’s event in his honour also featured a lecture by the ex-head of the country’s anti-graft agency, Nuhu Ribadu, who returned to Nigeria recently after going into exile last year.

Nuhu had fled Nigeria after surviving an assassination bid, allegedly over his anti-graft crusade in a country ranked as one of the world’s most corrupt by Transparency International.

“Corruption has made it difficult for the country to give adequate protection to its only source of revenue: petroleum and gas,” he said.

“The result is that today, Nigeria has one of the lowest per capital incomes in the world.”

He said “political leaders in the last 30 years have converted such revenue to sources of easy personal wealth…”

Nuhu Ribadu
Nuhu Ribadu

Ribadu, a retired policeman, was appointed chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission by former president Olusegun Obasanjo in 2001 but was removed in controversial circumstances six years later as stakeholders in the previous regime of Umaru Musa Yar’Adua stage-managed his removal following fears of corrupt accusations and eventual legal actions.